Learn Quickly about Multiple Sclerosis–All in One Place

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                                        Need Easy and Accurate Direction?

Confused? Afraid? Newly diagnosed? Think you or someone you know might have MS but don’t know where to start? Weird things going on with your body and you don’t know what to do? Your neurologist is not helpful or available? You are lost in cyberspace trying to get info?

Since I have lived with MS since 1980 and have been involved with the MS Community for almost thirty years, I know this disease inside and out. Seeing a great need to have a lot of credible “What-to-know—What to Do” MS information all in one place, I rolled up my sleeves and got to work. It now exists, and the positive feedback I have received from people has been equally overwhelming and gratifying.

I can help in two ways:

My Book: Managing MS: Straight Talk From a Thirty-One Year Survivor

I wrote a simplified, practical, all-in-one self-help guidebook for managing and understanding MS to help others dealing with this invisible, unpredictable, disabling disease. Within hours, you will gain knowledge and support so you can take action, which will reduce your fears.

Recently I received this email, one of many:

“OMG what a fantastic book in many ways. I want to give it to everyone I know so that they can understand it from the inside. Your section on invisible symptoms is fantastic. Everyone needs to read this book. Thank you, Debbie.”

Why should someone read THIS book? (Click here)

There are many books about multiple sclerosis; but I like to point out these things about mine:

• I felt it crucial to make it an easy read using a tone, words and expressions that would enable the reader to feel comfortable. Like I am talking at the kitchen table with them. Living with MS is frightening; one of my objectives was to help reduce the fear.

• Living with MS is not easy and is very complicated in many ways: the symptoms, the treatments, the medical professionals, relationships with people, the emotions, and the advancing disabilities. Thus, another objective of mine was to offer guidance and tips for managing these things in a manner that is easy to understand—like an instruction manual. I strived to make it compact, informative, and inspiring.

• This guidebook is a collaboration of both my experiences and those with peers, professionals, and others that I interacted with about MS in for decades.

• My manuscript had been read and endorsed by health care professionals in different fields that I believe lends credibility: An MS specialist neurologist, an internist, a MS physical therapist, and nurses.

• Though I share personal experiences, it is NOT an autobiography, full of medical terminology, nor does it contain the latest breakthrough drug or study.

WHO should read this book? Anyone who might have MS, has been diagnosed with MS, family, friends, or people who deal with MS patients such as doctors/healthcare personnel.

Diane Perry, NPC, AT Consultants in Internal Medicine in Glendale stated:
“As a nurse practitioner, the book opened my eyes to the effects of the disease on my patients’ lives and their needs. This is not a textbook read.”

Carol Daily, CRNP MSN, in her review said “This book should be given to every person having MS, I encourage any MS organization, medical staff, family or friend to do so and to read it also, especially the medical staff, (so you guys can give better advice).”

I encourage you to check out reviews on Amazon.

My Website DebbieMS: A Wealth of Info in One Place

I counsel, write, educate, research, and advocate awareness/understanding of MS through my website www.DebbieMS.com and other social media. In addition to info about my book Managing MS: Straight Talk…, the website includes my background/credentials, self-help/educational videos on a wide variety of topics, links to my 80+ MS Blog articles, an extensive list of helpful resources/articles, and other activities I engage in to help persons dealing with MS.

I continue to add to it, and especially use twitter and various MS Facebook group sites to share current research and developments about MS on an ongoing basis. People can also write to me through my site and ask me anything.

Please go to my website and check it all out. You have nothing to lose, and a lot to gain!

www.DebbieMS.com
Author/MS Counselor/Living with MS

 

**Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

How do you Manage MS?

“Want some help?”

Everybody wants a cure for MS, to halt the progression of it, and restore the damage it causes to us. But what do you do in the meantime until those things happen?

You manage your MS effectively.

If you ask people with MS how they manage it, most would respond by saying what treatments/meds they are taking and then add that they may exercise, do yoga, etc.

While this is true, it’s only a small part of a big answer. Everything about MS is complicated: the diagnosis, the symptoms and relapses, treatments, health team support, relationships, the explanation…  ALL of these things have to be managed effectively in order to survive MS.

One who manages their MS effectively is also helping to control their symptoms, relapses and the course and thus progression of their case. Yes, let me repeat that– One who manages their MS effectively is also helping to control their symptoms, relapses and the course and thus progression of their case.

I know, and I know countless others who know. Beginning in 1980, I’ve lived with it for 34 years, and have been actively involved in the MS community for nearly thirty years. An ordinary person of moderate means, I went through motherhood, had a career I had to eventually give up, managed a household, and enjoyed life.

In a nutshell, these are the main objectives in managing MS:

1. Prevent sickness/infections, physical problems, and long-term chronic stress.
Why?  Because any of these will trigger a relapse. And relapses usually result in progression and nervous system damage.

2. Take care of  your body in all ways to be healthy.
This includes getting enough sleep, exercise, eating sensibly, managing stress, being mentally and emotionally happy, etc. This also includes things like weight watching, no smoking, etc.

Why?  Staying healthy keeps one’s resistance up to prevent getting sick (thus preventing relapses) as well as keeping symptoms from intensifying. In addition, maintaining wellness helps prevent your body from getting other serious problems like high blood pressure, diabetes, poor circulation…

3. Carefully choose and monitor your treatments.
While drugs are often helpful for treating symptoms, relapses and slowing progression of MS, there are downsides.  First, one must remember that all drugs have side effects that add stress and other impairments to the body. Second, MS is a life sentence; one may live decades until a cure is discovered to halt progression or restore damage. Every drug taken is passed though the liver and has other risks. There is not a treatment that exists today that totally halts progression, relapses, or improves symptoms.

4. Use a 2-prong approach when managing symptoms.
In addition to using medications, there are SO many ways that MS symptoms can be managed non-medicinally—pain, spasticity, bladder issues…  Often, using a combination of using medicinal and non-medicinal means together can be helpful as well. For example, I take baclofen and do stretching exercises daily to reduce my spasticity.

In addition, alternative non-medicinal therapies  have been successful like yoga, acupuncture, massage, pilates, etc. to help with symptoms.

Managing MS effectively requires a tremendous amount of knowledge and support. It’s hard, it takes time, requires change, but it works.  However, learning to managing MS is a daunting task because we know that no two MS cases are alike and the disease is so unpredictable. Furthermore, because there is so much information available from so many sources, one can become overwhelmed and confused.

Want some help?

My book “Managing MS: Straight Talk…” is now available on eBooks for only $2.99 . You can also check out my website below for oodles of info—articles/resources with links, videos, my MS blog of nearly seventy articles, my credentials… The information is accurate, easy to understand, and concise.

My personal mission is to help others dealing with MS, and these two tools—my book and my website—will definitely help you with something. There is nothing to lose, and I guarantee something to gain!

 

**Video:  “How to Manage MS: Two Tools”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iliPH66JCaw

www.DebbieMS.com
Author/MS Counselor/Living with MS

MS Blogs

January 12, 2014

I am proud to announce that my MS Blog was selected for Neurology Now Magazine’s list of Patient Bloggers! http://journals.lww.com/neurologynow/Fulltext/2013/09060/Neurology_News__Having_Their_Say___Patient.16.aspx

Neurology Now Magazine:
December/January 2013 – Volume 9 – Issue 6 – p 14

Neurology News: Having Their Say: Patient Bloggers

“While your doctors can give you information and guidance about your condition, they’re not always the best source for practical advice. Patient bloggers offer that in spades as they chronicle their own journey with neurologic disease—sometimes funny, sometimes painful, but above all else, familiar. We tried to find blogs that are well-written, honest, and responsible in the way they handle medical information.”

Neurology Now is sponsored by the American Academy of Neurology and the American Brain Foundation. Free for subscribers, information is provided about various neurological problems in their publications. Included in each of their issues are also stories written about individuals—both well-known and unknown—who are dealing with a disorder/disease successfully. Here is a link to check it out http://patients.aan.com/index.cfm?axon=redirect&&path=/go/neurologynow  .

Also check out my 57 articles within this blog at the bottom of this blog page, as well as my website that contains much info about multiple sclerosis www.DebbieMS.com .

Best-

Debbie
Managing MS, Straight Talk…

Tell Jack Osbourne: We Need You After DWTS

“Be our Jerry Lewis?”

November 20, 2013

As I listened to Jack Osbourne talk frankly about his MS on Dancing with the Stars Monday night, I made a wish. I wished Jack would be an ongoing voice for the multiple sclerosis community after the program concludes. He has created awareness of MS and has inspired so many these past couple of months; however, when the show is over, I don’t want the buzz he is creating to be forgotten.

We have needed a well-known person that could do the same thing for multiple sclerosis that Jerry Lewis did for years with representing and fundraising for muscular dystrophy. But Jack could do even more in a different way, because Jack, unlike Jerry, lives with MS. He is one of us which makes him credible. And people like Jack.

I have been very involved with the MS community since my own diagnosis in the early 1980’s. While research has intensified and MS awareness has increased since then, a basic understanding of what MS really is still critically needed and equally important:

MS is an unpredictable, invisible, interfering, often disabling neurological disorder that has no cure and isn’t fatal or contagious. One that impacts millions of people, lasts a lifetime, and has immense costs associated with it for every citizen of the country.

It is amazing how many persons—even health professionals like nurses, GP’s—who don’t really understand what MS is. (Yes!—I actually gave a presentation about MS to an ER staff of fifty at a local hospital this summer.) There are many misconceptions about MS. (No!—20% end up in a wheelchair, not 100%.) And those of us dealing with this neurological disorder feel misunderstood, ignored, and forgotten. We feel this way because we know:

• On the outside so many of us look good unless we have some kind of walking aid to indicate otherwise. We’re not bleeding, we have good color in our faces, and we are not coughing or blowing our noses. When we look good, people automatically assume that we are good.

• Very often we are not good because so many of the symptoms are invisible. Pain, tingling, numbness, fatigue, dizziness, tightness, depression, blurry vision, balance, coordination—the list is endless. These symptoms interfere with everything we think, say or do. They are annoying; they hurt; they are frustrating; and they make us crabby. These symptoms are very disabling.

• Invisible symptoms are difficult to describe, and when we tell someone about them it’s hard for them to understand or empathize. Sometimes we use examples like “When I walk, it feels like I have a ten-pound weight on my ankle”, “It’s like when your arm falls asleep but never wakes up” or “My hands look normal, but I can’t button buttons.”

Jack “looked so good” dancing on the show. But then he talked about how his MS unpredictably acted up this past week, how it interfered with rehearsals, and what invisible symptoms he was experiencing (vision, fatigue, shooting pain in his limbs). With the intense stress with the finals in the competition, he is uncertain what will happen down the road with his health. It’s not like having a sprained ankle that will mend after it gets iced, wrapped, treated and rested.

We all know that to survive MS, a tremendous amount of support is necessary, and not only from family and friends. Physical, mental, emotional and financial support. Support for us individually due the difficulties and disabilities we live with; support for the MS community as a whole financially–to fund research for curing MS, preventing MS, and restoring lost function due to its damaging effects; and support for other programs such as social security disability.

People not understanding what MS is all about hinders the support that we need. MSers can learn to effectively “manage” their illness, not just “battle” it.

There are so many of us out there walking, biking, blogging and volunteering in countless ways to overcome our obstacles caused by MS. But it just hasn’t been enough, fast enough, or unified enough. Increased education and advocacy led by Jack Osbourne—such as hosting an annual united event–would enhance our goals exponentially.

What do you think? Will you ask Jack Osbourne to stay in the forefront and be our MS spokesperson? Or is this just wishful thinking on my part?

www.DebbieMS.com

March is MS Awareness/Education Month

“Get Involved”

March 4, 2013

YOU are needed to get involved if: you have Multiple Sclerosis, someone you know has MS, are involved with MS associations, or have MS patients in your profession.

Why? Watch this video about my orange ribbon campaign http://bit.ly/YPI1Kq

How? It’s very simple. Read my MS Blog article that includes a quick summary of “What is MS” http://blog.debbiems.com/?p=113 

Orange is the color that stands for MS. You can simply wear an orange ribbon every day on your lapel/shirt, in your hair, on your purse…….or you can tie an orange ribbon on your car or put one on your house!

Want to do more? Organize something as a team. Watch this fun video to see what we did at the Arizona Chapter of the National MS Society http://bit.ly/YJxleg  .

Please start today!

www.DebbieMS.com

Multiple Sclerosis: What EVERYONE Needs to Know

“People just don’t know about it.”

October 22, 2012

There are two things many people say that irks those of us that have Multiple Sclerosis:

  1. “It’s that Jerry Lewis thing, isn’t it?”
  2. “But you look so good!”

No, it’s NOT that Jerry Lewis thing.  Jerry Lewis represents MD—Muscular Dystrophy.  MS stands for Multiple Sclerosis. Two extremely different disorders.  As we MSers talk to each other, we get discouraged that MD has had a national figure representing and fundraising for them.  We wish we had a national well-known person that could do the same thing for multiple sclerosis. 

So many people are not aware of MS.

Nor do they understand it.

If people really understood MS, they would know not to say “But you look so good!”  We would like to respond back “Thanks, but we sure don’t feel as good as we look!”  Why?  Because multiple sclerosis is largely an invisible disorder.  People automatically associate MS with walking problems and wheelchairs.

Being a disease of the central nervous system, potentially anything controlled by the CNS can be affected:  sensory functions, sight, cognitive/emotional functions—in addition to motor functions. These MS symptoms are not only invisible; they are extremely common and very disabling. Some examples include fatigue, weakness, bladder/bowel/sexual problems, numbness and tingling sensations, loss of sensation, balance/coordination issues, loss of vision, pain, dizziness, depression; the list is enormous.

Someone who understands MS would also know the detrimental effect any type of heat has on a MSer, whether it’s from the temperature, a fever, the time of day or a hot flash.  Or that staggered walking is not from too many drinks, but rather from a loss of balance/coordination due to damage in the brain.

Also, since many symptoms are invisible, many people do not realize that someone may have MS.  Or, because they don’t see a cane, brace, or other disability device, it is assumed that a MSer is okay.  It is hurtful to get dirty looks and remarks when a “normal-looking” person with MS gets out of the car in a handicapped space; their ability to walk before their legs start to wobble may be just ten minutes or 100 steps.

So, both awareness and understanding are needed.  To survive MS, we need a tremendous amount of support, not only from our friends and family, but from everybody.  Physical, mental, emotional and financial support.  Support for us individually due the difficulties and disabilities we live with; and support for the MS community as a whole financially–to fund research for curing MS, preventing MS, and restoring lost function due to its damaging effects.

I started an Orange Ribbon campaign recently with the Arizona Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.  We MSers and some of our friends and families have just about finished 5,500 orange ribbon pins that represent multiple sclerosis (like the pink ones that stand for breast cancer).  Our goal is to have them ready for distribution at the Phoenix MS Walk on November 3rd.

We want to create more awareness, and when strangers ask us “what’s that orange ribbon for?” we will explain MS.  We will be advocators and educators.

So if you see someone wearing an orange ribbon on their lapel or shirt, it means either they have MS or someone that they know has MS.  We make them ourselves using orange satin floral ribbon and safety pins. 

During one of our ribbon-making sessions, a woman asked “What do you say when someone asks what MS is?  It is complicated and difficult to explain.”  Keeping it simple and uncomplicated, I would suggest this:

What is Multiple Sclerosis?

Multiple Sclerosis is disease of the central nervous system. Potentially anything controlled by the CNS can be affected–such as motor function, sensory function, sight, or cognitive/emotional functions.  Many symptoms are invisible, so many people don’t know someone has MS. (Examples: fatigue, weakness, bladder problems, numbness/tingling, pain…)

It is not fatal, contagious, or congenital.  There is no cure; the cause is unknown.  It is generally progressive.  The majority of persons afflicted will become disabled during the decades of their lifetime with no way to fix the damage. 

Every case of MS is different, unpredictable, and very uncontrollable. It is unknown what course the disease will take, what will be affected, how quickly it will happen, and how much disability will occur.  

There are new drugs that are trying to slow the progression, and meds to help relieve symptoms and shorten relapses. Nothing is available yet to prevent MS or restore lost functions resulting from its damaging effects.  However, there are many things one can learn to manage living with it.

We at the Arizona Chapter of the NMSS are starting to hand out copies of this brief description of MS to people we meet that do not know about multiple sclerosis.  We are going to encourage other MS groups and organizations to do the same.

We need help, and we certainly need a cure.

www.DebbieMS.com

 

 

World MS Day on May 30, 2012

Spreading the word: What is Multiple Sclerosis?

May 28, 2012

Many MS organizations and people are doing something for World MS day on Wednesday, and the question “What are you doing?” is asked of us in order to spread the word about MS awareness.

So I’m sending out this article about “What is MS?” to all my friends/contacts via all my online platforms and asking them to forward it on to everybody they are friends with online. I think people need to know what MS is, not just be aware of it.

What is MS?

Multiple Sclerosis is an autoimmune, inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves. That means that potentially anything controlled by the CNS can be affected–such as motor function, sensory function, sight, or cognitive/emotional functions.

It is not fatal, contagious, or congenital. There is no cure; the cause is unknown. The onset is usually from 20-50 years of age and most victims will have some form of progressive disability over time. That means that because there is no cure, the majority of persons afflicted (2.5+ million worldwide) will become disabled during the decades of their lifetime with no way to fix the damage. Current estimates are that 20-25% will end up in a wheelchair.

From the day those of us received our diagnosis, we have no idea what course our disease will take. What will be affected, in what way or how rapidly will we be affected, and how disabled will we become? Each case is different. MS is unpredictable and uncontrollable; the losses never stop, the grieving process never ends.

There are new drugs that are trying to slow the progression, and meds to help with relieving symptoms and shortening relapses. But they all have side effects. Nothing is available yet to prevent MS or restore most function lost resulting from its damaging effects; research continues to someday conquer these.

In the meantime, there are many things one can do to manage MS as effectively as possible, and find support to remain hopeful in stopping MS.

Please spread the word and pass this on. Thank you!
www.DebbieMS.com

MS Support: Know thy Neighbors

“My Eleventh Commandment”

If you have read my book Managing MS: Straight Talk…, you know about my own ten commandments I follow to manage my MS. I’m adding another one. As I was walking my dog around the neighborhood today, I reflected on how important my neighbors are to me. When I moved from Pittsburgh to Arizona in 2001, I lived alone for several years since my husband couldn’t join me until he retired. Being a planner and organizer, the first thing I did after settling in was become a co-director of our volunteer neighborhood block-watch program. I hosted the committee meetings and arranged quarterly weekend social events. The result? I immediately met and got to know everyone living around me. I made good friends, I found professionals (a mechanic, an a/c and heating technician, a computer guru, a lawyer…) and I felt safe. My dog and I have walked and patrolled the neighborhood daily for all these years, and if people don’t see me for a few days, they’re wondering why.

When a new neighbor moves in, I want to meet them. Recently, a new neighbor was putting the finishing touches on a new paint job for his new house. I introduced myself and told him how much I liked the color. It was instant rapport!

I love my neighbors, and can count on them if I/we need something, and vice versa. One terribly hot summer morning, my air conditioner stopped working. My a/c technician neighbor came to fix it within the hour I called. Another time when my husband was back East, I accidently pulled my Christmas tree over with my power chair at ten o’clock in the evening. I was surrounded by broken bulbs and lights! My girlfriend across the street came over immediately and picked it all up for me. If I’m home alone and I need assistance, I have a phone around me at all times so that I can call someone for help. They can get into my house by using the security-code keypad on my garage door. Many of our neighbors now are not only friends; they are like family to us and to each other. They are invaluable to me.

www.DebbieMS.com
Author, MS Counselor, Living with MS